History of the School

 

Chesterton was a parish in the Wolstanton Rural District from 1894 to 1904, then part of the Wolstanton United Urban District until 1932, when it was added to the Borough of Newcastle-under-Lyme.  The school itself, opened in 1901 and is a composite of early and mid 20th century buildings and architectural styles.  The original structure bears a plague stating 1903 Wolstanton School Board.  It would appear that the school was originally divided up into three distinct sections; junior, infants and nursery schools.  May Bank Infants school was constructed by the same architect.

 

Churchfields Primary was originally called Broadmeadow Council School and it was infant and junior school until 1912, when it became Broadmeadow Senior School.  In 1931, the infants and juniors transferred to Albert Street Schools.  Albert Street Junior boys transferred to these buildings in Dec 1958 and occupied the ground floor.  Between 1931 to 1958, it was a mixed secondary school when girls transferred to Chesterton CS school.

 

 

The thoughts of a former pupil

I grew up in Gainsborough Road (which is off Castle Street) and I remember my first meeting between my Mum and Mrs Harrington (the Year 1 teacher) when my mum registered me to start.  This was in 1980 when I was aged 4 and I remember all of my teachers; Mrs Harrington (with classroom assistant Mrs Clarke), Mrs Scholes, Miss Webb, Mrs Priestman, Miss Blackshaw, Mr Edwards, Mr Eardley, and Mrs Walker for Music.  They all worked under the watchful eye of Headmistress, Miss Hooton. 

Churchfields was a big part of the community and had been for a long time.  My granddad used to tell me about it when it was called Broadmeadows.  Back then (I believe) it was separated into a girls half and a boys half and both of which were secondary age pupils.  I have so many memories and most of them seem to involve me being naughty!  I remember kicking over the calendar (accidentally) in Mrs Harrington’s class; Mrs Scholes putting on the record player for school assembly (they gave her this job despite her having a shaky hand);  Miss Webb taking me out of the class play as I had thrown something at my friend, Lee Hitchen, causing him to get stitches (very sorry, Lee!); being asked by Mrs Priestman to not make the end of all of my letters curly (my handwriting must have caused her a few migraines); being removed from the class by Miss Blackshaw for never shutting up;  being shaken quite vigorously by Mr Edwards for bending spoons in the lunch hall; and never ever doing anything wrong with Mr Eardley because he scared the life out of me! 

Now that I’ve convinced you that I was the most disobedient pupil ever, and was hated by my teachers, let me also tell you that my education was absolutely first class.  The teachers, and all those working in the school, had the best interest of their pupils at heart.  As I was part of a single parent family, my teachers became figurative parents and they certainly set me on the straight and narrow path to have a happy and successful life.  I was taught to be responsible and to love to learn.  I am pleased and delighted to have seen Churchfields return to its best more recently.  It is a huge asset to the village of Chesterton and all of its residents.

Jon Mueller  ( Former Pupil )

 

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